Nikolay Peyko

Nikolai Ivanovich Peiko (Russian Николай Иванович Пейко, scientific transliteration Nikolai Ivanovich Pejko; * 12 Märzjul / March 25 1916greg in Moscow, .. † July 1, 1995 ) was a Russian composer.

Life

Peiko showed at an early age a marked interest in music and already wrote his first compositions in childhood. From 1933, he studied composition at the Music School in Moscow; In 1937 he transferred to the Moscow Conservatory where he studied under Nikolai Myaskovsky Nikolai Rakov and composition until 1940. After he had been in the years 1941 to 1943 in Ufa in a military hospital operates Peiko 1944 lecturer and assistant of Dmitri Shostakovich at the Moscow Conservatory. From 1952 he was a lecturer at the same site. In 1959 he transferred to the Moscow Gnessin Institute, a music school, where he worked until his death as professor of composition. Peiko was considered important composition teacher and taught his students to whom Sofia Gubaidulina and Alexander Arutjunjan include, on request also more modern compositional techniques such as twelve-tone case. Peiko received numerous awards, including two Stalin prizes for his first symphony (1947 ) and his Moldovan Suite ( 1951).

Tonal language

Peiko was a fairly traditional composer, who held on to an extended, enriched with dissonance tonality. His work partly reflects the influence of his friend Dmitri Shostakovich, but he tied much more than this, the folk music of the Soviet peoples in his musical language and undertook for this purpose is often research trips. Around 1960 found Peiko an independent musical language, which is based primarily on oft-repeated short, rhythmically incisive motifs and seemingly abrupt breaks. His works are more concise and focused, characteristic is an ironic, grotesque tone. Peiko preferred a distant, harsh, almost cool expression. He also emerged as a conductor and pianist of his own works.

Works

  • Orchestral works Symphony No. 1 in F sharp minor ( 1944-46 )
  • Symphony No. 2 in D major (1946 )
  • Symphony No. 3 in F major (1956 /57)
  • Symphony No. 4 in B minor ( 1963-65 )
  • Symphony No. 5 in A major (1968 /69)
  • Symphony No. 6 in E minor (1972 )
  • Symphony No. 7 in A Minor for folk instrument orchestra ( 1977)
  • Symphony No. 8 in E minor ( 1982-85 )
  • Symphony No. 9 for string orchestra ( 1988-90)
  • Symphony No. 10 " 12 aphorisms and postlude " (1993)
  • Concert Symphony in E major ( 1972-74 )
  • Sinfonietta for Small Orchestra in C minor (1959 )
  • "From the early Russia," Suite ( 1948)
  • " Moldovan Suite " (1950)
  • " 7 pieces on topics of the Soviet peoples," Suite ( 1950)
  • "From the legend of Yakutia " Suite ( 1940-59 )
  • Elegiac poem for string orchestra (1980 )
  • " November 7 ", Symphonic Poem (1986 /87)
  • Piano Concerto ( 1942-54 )
  • 2 Fantasies for Violin and Orchestra (No. 1 in E minor on Finnish themes, 1953, No. 2 in G Minor, 1964)
  • Concert Variations for cello and orchestra (1981 )
  • Concert Poem for balalaika, clarinet and orchestra (1978 )
  • Concerto for oboe and chamber orchestra (1982 /83)
  • "Spring Wind", Ballet (1950 )
  • " Jeanne d' Arc ", Ballet ( 1953-56, rev. 1978/79 )
  • " Abakajada ", Ballet (1981 /82)
  • " Aichylu " Opera (1941, rev. 1951)
  • "A Night of Tsar Ivan ", oratorio (1968, 1982 Opera fashioned )
  • Song Cycles
  • String Quartet No. 1 in F sharp minor (1963 /64)
  • String Quartet No. 2 in F sharp minor (1965 )
  • String Quartet No. 3 in E minor (1976 )
  • String Quartet No. 4 (1983 )
  • Piano Quintet in D major (1961 )
  • Dezimet for piano, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, violin, viola, cello and double bass in E minor (1971 )
  • " Bashkir melodies " for cello and piano (1942 )
  • Piano Sonata No.1 in E minor ( 1946-54 )
  • Piano Sonata No. 2 in A major ( 1972-75 )
  • Piano Sonata No. 3 (1990/ 91)
  • Sonata for the Left Hand (1992 )
  • Sonatina No. 1 (1942 )
  • Sonatina No. 2 (1957 )
  • Ballade in B minor (1939 )
  • Concert Variations in A minor for Two Pianos (1983 )
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