Aloe dinteri

Aloe dinteri is a plant of the genus of aloes in the subfamily Asphodelus ( Asphodeloideae ). The specific epithet dinteri honors the German botanist Kurt Dinter.

  • 3.1 Literature
  • 3.2 Notes and references

Description

Vegetative characteristics

Aloe dinteri grows individually, is stemless and reaches stature heights of 26 inches and is just as wide. The approximately twelve lanceolate pointed, folded - keeled leaves are arranged in three rows. Their tip they are cross-sectionally V -shaped. The chocolate- brown or dark brownish green leaf blade is 20 to 30 inches long and 5-8 inches wide. On the sheet surface contains many elongated white spots, which are arranged more or less in the transverse bands. The narrow white leaf margin is cartilaginous. The keel on the bottom has a 1 mm thick cartilage edge. The white solid teeth on the leaf margin are 0.5 mm long and are 1 to 2 millimeters apart. In the direction of the blade tip, they are smaller and are crowded. The keel is filled with similar teeth.

Inflorescences and flowers

The inflorescence consists of three to eight branches and is 50 to 85 inches long. The loose, cylindrical tapered grapes are 15 to 20 inches long and 7 inches wide. The lanceolate bracts deltoids run at very pointed and are slightly shorter than the pedicels. The bright pink, red, blue frosted flowers are brighter towards its mouth to nearly white. The flowers are 28 to 30 millimeters long and rounded at their base. At the level of the ovary, they have a diameter of 6.5 millimeters. In addition they are narrowed to 3.5 mm and finally expanded to its muzzle. Your outer tepals are not fused together over a distance of up to 10 millimeters. The stamens and the style protrude 1 mm from the flower.

Systematics, distribution and hazard

Aloe dinteri is widespread in Namibia on limestone rocks in a low bush.

The first description by Alwin Berger was published in 1914.

Aloe is dinteri in the Red List of Threatened Species IUCN as "Least Concern ( LC) ," ie, not compromised as in nature, classified.

Evidence

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